An Interview with Jessica Nash by Sian Matthews

An artist working predominantly with photography in east London, Jess works with themes such as touch, skin, sex and cancer and uses these themes to explore her own relationships, fears and curiosities on an incredibly personal level. On the surface her photographs are very clean, beautiful to look at and are reminiscent of the surreal and eccentric images used to sell perfume or jewellery in editorial magazines. However, once you peel away that serene exterior it is clear that her images are a way for the artist to explore and understand the sometimes hard-hitting issues she faces in her personal life. Like many artists Jess uses her work as a way to document and catalogue her struggles as well as a form of healing and understanding. I met up with Jess to discuss the topics and motives behind her work and to get to know her a little more as an individual, away from the sometimes gloomy subject matter of her work.

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Infectum Pellis, Jess Nash

Infectum Pellis is an ongoing project in which the artist is further examining her relationship with skin and touch. These photographs show the skin as tense and restrictive, reflecting the way haphephobia, the fear of being touched causes the artist to feel in her own skin. Jessica’s practice is heavily influenced by her relationship with skin, sex and cancer.

 

It has been couple of weeks now since I met up with Jess in Loughton to get a coffee and I had planned to start our interview with some silly, light-hearted questions just to break the ice and to  have a little fun, the ice was broken however when I found myself waiting for her after she found a hoard of old Polaroid cameras in a charity shop and her excitement got the better of her (who doesn’t get excited over old cameras in charity shops though, right?).

Once we were sat down, coffee in hand, we started to chat about how Jess currently works for Polaroid and generally had a catch up. I should mention here that I have known Jess for a couple of years now, having met after being invited to exhibit alongside her and a few other artists at ‘The Body Exhibition’ in Peckham. An exhibition exploring the relationships between artist and body which Jess had organised in conjunction with her degree.

The body exhibition

 

Once that was over with, we started the interview with some quick fire questions!

 

Q. Do you have a favourite artwork or an artwork you feel drawn to?

A. I don’t think I have just one favourite piece, there are a few that come to mind. But the book ‘Pond’ By Clair Louise Bennett, although not an ‘artwork’ really stands out and is important to me.

 

 

Q. Is there a song, a piece of music or a band that inspires you?

A. Again there’s a few, I love listening to Ludovico Einaudi in the studio and when I’m working, its something easy to listen to and have on in the background that isn’t too distracting. I also enjoy listening to James Blake for similar reasons and i also feel inspired when listening and dancing to old Motown.

Picked for the blog –

 

Q. Can you name 3 artists who have inspired or informed your work?

A. Mia Dubek, Alix Marie and Marina Abramovich. I’m not necessarily inspired by them anymore but they have informed my work in the past. Particularly with Marina Abramovitch, I once loved her work and she inspired me a lot but now I’m not sure I like her at all, she seems to have an arrogance about her now that I don’t like, I know that’s quite an unpopular opinion and very controversial because everyone seems to love her but I am just not into it anymore. (It is controversial but… I completely agree!)

 

Also see: https://miadudek.co.uk/Publications

 

Q. What is your biggest pet peeve, and why?

A.I have a lot. But definitely people who breathe too loudly, or people who breathe on you on the tube. I really hate it when you can feel someone’s breath on you.

 

Q.If you could choose, what super power would you have and why?

A. Errrm, it’s not really a superpower but something I would love is to have the ability to have eaten without actually having to stop to eat. I find stopping what I’m doing to eat very time consuming and I wish I could eat without having to eat. If that makes sense?

 

Q. Do you have a favourite museum or gallery? Or an exhibition you have visited recently that really stood out to you?

A. I think one of my favourite galleries is the König Galerie in Berlin because of its architecture. It has super high ceilings and the light is amazing.

 

Galerie-Berlin

 

Q. What do you dislike about the art world as a whole?

A. There are too many people trying to break into the industry and technology makes it too easy and too difficult. Its so over saturated because its so easy to put yourself out there via social media, like Instagram, that its also difficult to get noticed, whether its for your artwork or for a creative job.

 

Q. Other than art and photography, what interests do you have?

A. Since finishing Uni I have been pushing myself to try new things as a way to stay creative, its hard to stay in that mind set when you don’t really have a space to work in that’s dedicated to art, like a studio or other people to work with and bounce ideas off of. I have recently taken up crochet, needle punch and other yarn-based crafts. I recently started going skateboarding too because its out of my comfort zone and I am trying to push myself. Other than that I also enjoy doing a lot of stereotypical ‘hobbies’ that people say they do, except I actually do them, like reading, cooking, yoga and gardening.

 

Q. What is your earliest creative memory?

A. The first photo I remember taking was of my family on the beach, I was about 4 I think. I cropped my dad’s head off by accident.

 

Q. If you could visit anywhere on earth, where would you go?

A. Anywhere with a lot of stars! There is a place in Ireland where you can see the most stars anywhere on the planet because of the way its positioned. I’d love to take a trip there. I also really like Cornwall. I wouldn’t go far, just somewhere beautiful.

 

Moving onto the more serious questions I wanted to talk about Jess the artist, I wanted to find out about her thought processes and the motives, themes and inspirations behind the work she creates. So I started off broadly..

 

Q. To start, what exactly is it that you do? In terms of what mediums do you use, what do you aim to explore and what do you want to portray to the audience?

A. I take photos as a kind of therapy, I find that it’s a way to talk about something and communicate with the world without being static. I often think of myself as being very monotone in the way I talk about things and the way that I explain things, photography is an easier way to be expressive and show more feeling.

I also chose to use film because it’s much more tactile than digital, you end up with a physical object to hold and a process to follow – it mimics the idea of being about touch.

 

Old Wives Tales

Old Wives Tales is a diptych of self portraits. The photographs show a perhaps uncomfortably literal version of the artists memories. From a young age, the artist would bathe with her twin brother and whilst she would make ‘potions’ with whatever shampoos she could find, her brother played with rubber sea creatures. Their mother once told them a story of how the rubber octopus might use his suckers and tentacles to wrap around their feet and pull them down the plug hole. The second photograph shows of a hoop earring being pulled, looking back at when she was told that to wear them would meant that she would one day ‘rip’ her ear out.

 

Q. What themes do you use in your work and why?

A. I used to work with skin as an object – how you use it to communicate with the world. My twin brother was diagnosed with melanoma, skin cancer, it really started to affect me and unavoidably my work began to be influenced by both his struggle and mine. I also use my work to explore the tense and restrictive way my haphephobia, the fear of being touched, causes me to feel. At the same time I also started to investigate how skin can be used to convey more of a sexual message, separate from my other work.

 

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one of two

Through my series One of Two I was able to show the relationship between my twin brother and I. Shot in our home studio, The series uses natural light to show the organic nature of our relationship and how although we are growing together, we are also growing apart. Using a white background allowed me to show him as one. This project was a way for me to acknowledge how independent we have become from each other.

 

Q. And what made you think to make art about this subject matter?

A. It came completely naturally, when something so significant is happening with your home and personal life you can’t help but let it spill over into other things, in some ways making work about everything that was going on was cathartic, it was a way to release it all into something, it was freeing. While I was making this work I also had a separate project that was sort of documenting a relationship and a person who was absolutely nothing to do with my home life. I feel like I had to have this project running alongside my other work as a distraction.

 

Q. Where do your ideas and inspirations come from? What kind of research to do you?

A. I read a lot, both literature and poetry. Weirdly I don’t look at other photos or photographic artists, I get a lot of inspiration from watching videos, films, specifically home videos. I also like to just talk to people. You get a lot of information just by talking. And people watching. I guess my research style is very non traditional, I like to collect things and getting lost in Instagram.

 

Q. Are there any inherent qualities that your work has that you dislike?

A. I don’t like that it has a trendy aesthetic and a trendy colour pallet, it means that people don’t ask the right questions and a lot of the time they take it at face value. I also feel like it needs to have more writing to accompany it at shows because people don’t get it. But that defeats the object really.

 

Q. What is the most memorable response you have had to your artwork? (coincidentally, Jess asking to exhibit my work after seeing it at Free Range the year before is mine!)

A. My work was shown in the largest photography exhibition in China, they asked for my work to be sent as a digital file with printing instructions which I did. They ended up printing it on the wrong paper, the wrong size and then hung them in the wrong order. It was crap and I was really disappointed. What I thought was a great opportunity was ruined.

One of my brother’s friends has recently got his own place and wants to buy one of my photographs and not just because we’re friends, he genuinely wants to buy my work and it’s a massive compliment!

I’ve also got my work onto the front cover of the Royal Photography Society magazine which is a huge achievement and I am very excited about.

 

Royal Photographic Society

 

Q. What is your dream project? Art or otherwise?

A. I really want to try printing onto latex and making garments. With latex though, it’s extremely hard to work with and expensive which is holding me back. I don’t have a space to work in at the moment or anywhere to store stuff.

 

Q. What is the best piece of advice you have been given?

A. ‘You are responsible for what you’re doing’, there is no use getting stressed about your art work because it is only what you make it. Sometimes it is good to be reminded of that. And also ‘you’ve got time to do what you want to do’

 

Q. Professionally, what is your goal?

A. Right now my goal is to have my own studio space – to find people who I can collaborate with – I just want to be making. I also don’t want my job to be my artistic practice, I want there to be a break between the two.

I would love the opportunity to exhibit my work in the RA Summer exhibition and I want to go back to Uni and study for a MA at Bournemouth.

 

Q. And lastly, what’s next for you? What can we expect to see from you in the next year or so?

A. I want to start a new Polaroid project, maybe something to do with collage. I like the medium, I like that its instant. I’d like to start putting myself forward for more opportunities and exhibit my work more, possibly across Europe?

 

I just wanted to finish by saying a big thanks you Jess for her time and if you want to explore Jess’s work further you can do so by visiting her website or via social media, links below!

jessicanash.co.uk

Instagram – jess.a.nash

 

 

 

 

 

Ama-zine!; A Zine Guide to London. by Gwendolyn Faker

We’ve been building a zine library and working on our very own Sweet Art Zine. As we approach our zine release we thought we’d share our favourite hot spots! If you’re a collector or a maker or even if you’re entirely new to the medium there’s a zine out there just for you. Now let’s see if we can’t help you find it.

Wikipedia says; “A zine (/ˈzn/ zeen; short for magazine or fanzine) is most commonly a small-circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images, usually reproduced via photocopier. Usually zines are the product of a single person, or a very small group…”

Now as much as we love wikipedia we prefer to get our knowledge direct from women with real life experience and first hand knowledge. We got in touch with Grrrl Zine Fair founder Lu Williams to talk about zines, zine culture, and what the Grrrl Zine Fair is all about.

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We visited the last Grrrl Zine Fair event where we were able to meet the makers and pick up a few TREASURES to add to our growing zine library. We did a little walk through to share with you, because it sucks to miss out!

 

Now, if you just can’t wait until the next zine fair we’ve got you covered. We’re going to take you across London to all the spots we know, are you ready?!

We’ll start in East London for the first leg of this zine odyssey.

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The Anarchist Book Shop; can be found with a little work at 84b Whitechapel High Street in the East End of London. Founded in 1886 is the largest anarchist publishing house in the country and oldest of its kind in the English speaking world.‘The book publishing arm (Freedom Press) has a history stretching back almost 150 years and has brought pamphlets by luminaries of the time to London audiences and beyond. In the modern era it has published every year since 1984,’ 

 

…except for between 2012 and 2013 following an arson attempt on the building.

It’s secreted down a narrow alley so it’s a little hard to find, obscured by a KFC sign next door. What you’re looking for is a narrow alley a few meters West of the White Chapel Gallery… it’s under the KFC sign. Now once you’re inside the effort you’ve put into finding it will be well worth it. It’s full (literally from floor to ceiling in some places) with flyers, manuals, books, pamphlets, zines, patches, stickers, badges, and much more. Everything you could ever need to start a revolution can be found between these walls. They have an extensive selection of titles on a huge variety of subjects(our favorite being ‘What About the Rapists?’). *You can check out a small selection of what’s in stock from their online shop, but we recommend visiting for the full experience.

Whitechapel Gallery as we mentioned, is literally next door to The Anarchist Bookshop. The gallery is pretty notable; with displays, commissions and archive galleries that are free and open all year round, six days a week. The Gallery also hosts ticketed shows and past exhibitions have included work by Sarah Lucas, Keith Sonnier, Hannah Höch, and a recent takeover by the Geurrilla Girls.

The gallery shop is mostly books with zines here and there. Because it’s a gallery shop what’s on offer changes pretty frequently depending on what’s being shown. In the past we’ve found more than a dozen zines on the shelves.

From there it was on to Brick Lane Books, it’s on Brick Lane(duh!). A few blocks away there’s Beach on Cheshire street. Visiting the area in the week it’s pretty quiet, visiting on a Sunday when the market is in full swing is a whole other story…

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You can continue heading east into Hackney where you can get a real bang for your buck (pound?). If you visit Broadway Market you’ll find Donlon Books, Broadway Bookshop, and Artwords; three small but well stocked shops, all of which have some pretty rad zines. If you make this a destination on any given Saturday and as the name suggests you’ll find another market in full swing.

 

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The final stop in East London is pretty conveniently located as Banner Repeater happens to be on platform 1 at Hackney Downs train station. It’s an Artist-led contemporary art space: a reading room, and experimental project space, founded by Ami Clarke in 2010. Their reading room holds a permanently sited public archive of Artists’ Publishing which you can browse, and a shop that’s always changing but always filled with independently published books and zines.

Heading into the West ; you can visit the ICA, aka The Institute of Contemporary Art. Founded in 1946, the ICA ‘promotes and encourages an understanding of radical art and culture‘. Usually running a varied programme of exhibitions, films, talks and events. The book shop is usually pretty well stocked with a selection of independently published magazines. What you’ll find on offer here is a little glossier than your regular zine fare, but that doesn’t mean you won’t find a good old fashioned xerox’d zine on the shelves.

IMG_7040Near Tottenham Court tube you can also stop into Claire de Rouen. Focusing on art, fashion, and photography, the shop in another nearly secret spot (look for the all black door next to the betting shop). Selling beautiful print products in all forms, zines included. Once you’ve managed to find the entrance and make your way up a flight of stairs you’ll find a bright and cozy little shop. With soft light, fresh flowers, and music drifting from a record player at the back this place is hashtag aesthetic.

If you want to indulge your nerdier side(who doesn’t?) hit GOSH! and Orbital comics. Two of the best comic shops in London. Both stock a wide range of new and vintage/collectible comic books and a selection of independently published work. Whether you’re looking for that Archie VS. The Punisher cross over comic, a first issue Spiderman, or trying to get your hands on a copy of SNOTGIRL both of these spots will have you covered, they’ve even got offerings for the manga connoisseur.

Down South there’s The Feminist Library. Started in 1975 as a small collection of contemporary material it is now considered to be the most significant library of feminist material in England contains 7500 books of which 5000 are non-fiction, 500 poetry publications and 1500 periodical titles; many self-published, spanning more than 85 metres of shelving. The Feminist Library Book Shop is open on Saturday (12-5pm). They sell new and used books, periodicals and zines. They also serve coffee and cake and host readings and events.

There’s also 56a which got it’s start when the building was squatted. More of a political centre than a bookshop 56a calls itself an ‘infoshop’. It’s staffed by volunteers and they stock countercultural press. With works that explore everything from (trans)feminism, anti-colonialism, anti-globalisation, environmentalism, squatting, anti-fascism, No Borders, queer politics/organising, anarchism, situationism, autonomism, anti-civilisation, anti-capitalism, radical pedagogy, DIY, bikes, self-care, cooperatives, permaculture, consensus organising, to armed struggle, this place is a pretty radical (literally). They also have a zine library, open ‘til 8pm on Thursdays.

This barely scratches the surface of where you can find zines in London, those are just a few of our favorites.

Did we miss something? Would you like us to check out your zine or zine event?

x Gwendolyn Faker

It’s the Future! – by Corrina Eastwood

Well we made it! Its 2015! Great Scott where are the hover boards?!……… Oh well, who needs hover boards when you’ve had a year like ours! 2014 was quite a special one for us at Sweet ‘Art for so many reasons and we thought you may like to take a little stroll down memory lane with us before we get stuck into 2015 Sweet ‘Art style. We started the year recovering from our Christmas show Frieze and launching this blog that we are very proud of, with it now being read in 56 different countries including the US, China, Israel and Rwanda! We also began planning our first show of the year, ‘Visions Of Dr H’. A joke started on FB and which we probably took a bit too far, we decided with artist Karen Boughey to host a super fun exhibition of portraits of Dr Huxtable from the 80’s sitcom The Cosby Show! I mean why not? We spoke to some of our artists who all had fond memories of the character and were equally enthusiastic about the idea. We then all got to painting portraits and knitting tiny little Dr H jazzy jumpers for our press releases and teamed up with our new friends over at Juno bar and gallery in Shoreditch for this one of a kind show! Those little jumpers did the trick as we were sponsored by the mighty Johnny Walker Whisky and featured in the London Metro amongst other press all loving the show. Juno have said it has been their most popular and visited show to date and we made many sales. Who would have thought it? Guests on our opening night also enjoyed an interactive piece by Jerome Beresford where your projected self could dance adorned by one of many digitally generated jazzy jumpers!

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Visions of Dr H Exhibition

Dr H

Visions of Dr H Exhibition

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Interactive Piece by Jerome Beresford at Visions of Dr H Exhibition

In light of recent and historic allegations made against Bill Cosby that we were not aware of at the time of the show, we have wondered as a team how people have felt about the show since. ‘Visions of Dr H’ was an exhibition dedicated to the character Dr Huxtable which many of us grew up watching and loved, rather than Bill Cosby himself, but we are undoubtedly saddened by the nature of the crimes he is accused of regardless and invite those of you reading to share your thoughts and feelings about the show if you wish. The Sweet ‘Art team then parted company for a few months with Gav and I deciding to take some time out to embark on an arty world tour while the rest of the team held down the fort back in London. You can read all about S’A on the road in this blog but we must mention the amazing time we had meeting artists all around the globe and visiting some incredible exhibitions, studios and galleries. New Orleans and Santa Fe in the US were definitely beautifully creative highlights, as was meeting new friends in Texas at the LPM Gallery and the amazing studio visits with artist Water Kerner in LA and Antonius Khos in Bali. We have been so lucky to make so many new inspiring contacts and are currently working on funding proposals for international collaborations in both the US and Vietnam.

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Sweet ‘At on the Road in Texas

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Sweet ‘Art on the Road in Santa Fe

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Sweet ‘Art on the Road Studio Visit with Water Kerner in LA.

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Sweet ‘Art on the Road Visit with Annie Wells at the LMP Gallery in Austin, Texas

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Sweet ‘Art on the Road some down time on the Beach In Vietnam

So Gav and I returned home in June inspired and rearing to go and with the team back together we began planning our largest and most ambitious show to date. Starting as an idea by our lovely Charlotte we decided on a large multi-disciplinary exhibition to coincide with London Fashion Week. We wanted ‘Seams’ to showcase artists from all disciplines including fashion design, with garments that could be on display and worn by models on our opening night! We wanted works that explored where fashion meets art and art meets fashion! We wanted works that celebrated fashion but that also intelligently critiqued the fashion industry and fashion norms! We wanted interactive artworks, stunning installations, insightful paintings, neon, sound, edibles, amazing sponsors and a stunning, cool exhibition space located in the centre of the London art scene! So…….we made it happen! Not before enlisting some amazing help in the form of our awesome hard working interns. This year we have welcomed Jade, Anthony, B, Diana, Rosie, Shikara and Karolina into the S’A family. Together we made ‘Seams’ a huge success that we are so very proud of. Taking place at the Hoxton Arches Gallery in Shoreditch and sponsored by the amazing Sipsmith and Crystal Head Vodka our opening night was one mahooosive arty party. We had interactive fashion pieces designed by Shara Hayz and worn by the lovely Rosie and Shikara in the form of amazing sound activated light up jackets! The Sweet team also collaborated with Carolyn Butler and George Kloet to create Sweetshop, an interactive online artwork that challenged and critiqued the fashion and media industries that Rooms Magazine reviewed as an “edgy, satirical exploration.” We also chose to raise money for the charity BODY, who support those suffering from body image related issues including Body Dimorphic Disorder. Why not listen in here to interviews on the opening night by East London Radio!

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Seams Exhibition

Seams PV

Seams Exhibition

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Seams Exhibition

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Seams Opening Night

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Seams Opening Night

We followed up Seams a few months later with another awesome group show back at Juno. ‘Guilty Pleasures’ showcased the work of S’A artists old and new exploring the thrill, the fun, the sinister, the surreal, the absurd, the grotesque, the bizarre, the debauched, the moving and the taboo in the world of Guilty Pleasures! We enjoyed our now infamous anatomical heart cakes at our opening night washed down by Junos’ special Guilty Pleasures cocktails while listening to some Guilty Pleasures tunes courtesy of S’A friend and DJ Alex!

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Guilty Pleasures Exhibition

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Guilty Pleasures Opening Night

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Guilty Pleasure Exhibition

………and for December? We finished the year with two great shows just for good measure. We decided to take a alternative look at the festive season with ‘Saturnalia’ and ‘GIF(t)’. Saturnalia was a Roman holiday in December celebrated with a sacrifice, banqueting and continual partying that over turned social norms! Krampus is a demonic beast-like creature from folklore who was said to punish children during the Christmas season and carry them off to his lair! We decided we wanted more pagan than panto, less of The Snow Man and more of The Wicker Man this Christmas and so asked artist to explore these alternative Christmas themes for our show. We had an amazing opening night enjoying Junos’ delicious mince pies and mulled wine and guests were treated to some arty prezzies courtesy of Krampus’ sinister sack!

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Saturnalia Exhibition Poster

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Saturnalia Opening Night

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Saturnalia Exhibition at Juno Shoreditch

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Saturnalia Exhibition

We ended the year with GIF(t), a UK first! Headed up by Jerome, GIF(t) was an exhibition of small works by selected artists showcasing an exciting new technology. We selected twelve talented gif artists that have begun to make their gifs into physical artworks via lenticular printing, sponsored for GIF(t) by the awesome people at gifpop! We collaborated with The Circle in Soho for this show and a great opening night was had by all thanks again to those Moscow mules courtesy of our friends at Crystal Head Vodka. We want to thank all the artists that participated, some flying in from as far as the US to be at the opening night!

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Gif(t) Exhibition Opening Night

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GIF(T) Exhibition at The Circle Soho

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GIF (t) Exhibition Opening Night

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GIF(t) Exhibition

I think you will agree that we had quite a year but what’s in the diary for 2015?! Well we are starting with launching our brand new website which looks amazing, even if we do say so ourselves. Do take a look and you will notice we have introduced our online store ‘Sweet Shop’. We have an ongoing submissions policy for Sweet Shop and are already in the process of working on its launch! If you are an artist that would like to get involved please visit our opportunities page for details. You will also notice our new submissions process via the site. I know, I know its pretty nerdy and yes we have been way too excited than is healthy about our new database and submissions procedure! It will help us to keep on top of all the submissions we now receive without anyone missing out on a chance to exhibit with us! Also on the site you can find out more about our amazing little team, the services we offer and check out our updated promo. What more could you want?! As for shows we have the whole year mapped out and are super excited! First up we’re going back to our roots and holding a large group show for International Women’s Day in March. The call for artists will be on the site very soon so keep an eye on our latest news sweet ‘arts and Happy New Year!!

Welcome to Sweet ‘Art’s blog

Happy New Year from Sweet ‘Art!!!………..and to mark the end of an amazing first year we have decided a Sweet ‘Art blog is just what’s needed! We want to launch our blog with giving you an overview of all the fun we had in 2013 and also to ask for your help in making 2014 even better.

So to start us off lets cast our minds back to those awesome vagina cakes! In March we launched with our first show in aid of international women’s day as part of the One Billion Rising campaign while raising funds for Wise Dolls, a charity supporting female survivors of domestic violence through arts therapies. We showed the work of 40 artists from all over the world in a celebration of the achievements and contributions of women as well as a critique of the way in which women are perceived, shaped and contained within society.

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Held at the atmospheric Crypt Gallery, St Pancras, we hosted a fun private view event with over 400 guests enjoying drinks courtesy of our sponsors Asahi and Black Cow vodka and of course those delicious vagina cakes. Highlights were the incredible digital fashion installation by Shara Hayz where guests were invited to drink at the Futuritual alter in the depth of the Crypt, and the haunting instillation of Laura Jean Healy who’s film Siren was projected life size, seamlessly into one of the Crypts eerie caverns. The after party wasn’t too bad either apparently although most of us have a hazy memory!

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Next up was our hotly anticipated Summer Show that took place at the Espacio Gallery in Bethnel Green, only a stones throw away from Brick Lane for a sneaky bagel. We did eat a special amount of bagels but worked incredibly hard on this show and it was one hell of an arty party, with the mighty Sipsmith as our sponsors our guests enjoyed their delicious summer cup while relaxing on deckchairs, taking a break from viewing the art of over 30 artists in the mediums of painting, illustration and sculpture. To fit perfectly with our end of pier vibe we invited the wonder that is JoWOnder to perform ‘JoWOnder and the Psychic tealeaves’ on the private view night. Her spooky entrance causing quite a stir on the Bethnal Green road!

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Then we had a mini event, ‘Aneurithms’ that brought together the work of two artists Sweet ‘Arts Jerome Beresford and director Corrina Eastwood who’s work visually and conceptually explored the contrast and tension that can be created between a desire for precision and an appreciation of the beauty in error. A First Thursday event and with Sipsmith on board again it was quite difficult to get people to leave the Wayward Gallery on Vyner St for the private view night! People loved our Sweet ‘Art anatomical heart cakes (which are getting quite a name for themselves we hear) and a collaborative interactive installation where visitors where invited to create their own Aneurithms art work by moving their bodies in front of a sensor and projector. Sounds complicated but proved to be awesome fun!

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The Espacio Gallery were so impressed with our Summer Show they asked us back and we finished the year with the packed-out Freeze show in December. This was our most ambitious and fun show to date and with sponsors like Ocado and old favourites Sipsmiths, guests enjoyed winter cocktails, mulled wine and mince pies around the Sweet ‘Art Christmas tree and the amazing talent of a range of works by over 40 artists. This included fun winter themed instillations involving a magical kinetic interactive snowstorm though a Narnia style wardrobe created by the Sweet ‘Art team as well as lots of brussel sprouts courtesy of super talent Siân Spicer!

All works were sized A3 and under, with the aim to supplying London with a choice of art Christmas gifts that could be carried home on the tube and with a shop-in-shop from hot designer brand Maison Twenty, with art t-shirts for sale lots of people had some pleasing gifts in their stockings this year thanks to our amazing artists. We also raised a generous amount of money for our chosen charity Shooting Star Chase with thanks to our sponsors Bodos Schloss who donated an amazing raffle prize. We even saw our first Sweet ‘Art marriage proposal at Freeze, congrats Mark and Mark!!!

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So its been quite a year and that’s not to mention our Box Park pop up with Jester Jacques, artists portraits by the likes Louis Orchison, working with amazing photographers such a Richard Edwards and all the fun filming promos, attending events and meeting new amazing people including our incredible intern Karina Geddes who’s hair often matches our logo!

So what will 2014 bring?

Well watch this space, and with this space in mind we would like to invite you to get involved with our blog! Are you an artist who would like to add a blog post about your current practice for us to share? Have you seen a great inspiring exhibition lately you would like to shout about and have your musing published here? How about seen a great film or read a great art book, or a rubbish one for that matter? Well let us know by emailing us your work. We can’t wait to hear from you.