A belated Frieze week review by Sian Matthews

Well over a month after the big event I still have a lot I want to say and discuss, good and bad, about all things Frieze 2019.

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This year’s fair had a focus on the climate crisis and demonstrated this by including artworks such as Patrick Goddard’s ‘Blue Sky Thinking’ which uses hundreds of dead parakeets to ram the message home.

However, I haven’t seen much in the way of the fair itself addressing its carbon footprint, the only steps it seems to have taken this year is to switch to using biofuel.

One of the interactive projects this year was by the organisation Arto LIFEWTR who thought it was a brilliant idea to use PLASTIC bottles to display artworks by emerging artists and hand them out to visitors, along with pins by artist John Booth in exchange for posting about them on social media. I feel like I must have missed something on this because it just seems too tone deaf to be a real thing? I literally saw these bottles discarded everywhere all week.

Including at TOAF and Tate modern.

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I can’t understand why a fair with a focus on the climate crisis included an interactive installation which was centred around plastic bottles, something which as a society we should be using less of. Also, as I am writing this I am sat with a stack of handouts, newspapers, maps, all the paper that gets thrown at you while visiting the fair.

For a fair talking about climate change and carbon footprints there was a huge amount of waste. Something to think about.

Moving on to something more positive, One of the live artworks which I particularly enjoyed was an interactive artwork in which the participant becomes part of the piece after being asked to hold a feather duster perfectly still and to concentrate on not moving the feathers. Of course, this is impossible as the more you try the harder it gets. The feathers pick up the participants heartbeat and breathing so that you physically cannot hold it still. After the frustration subsides and you concentrate more on the movement of the feathers in time with your own heart beat it becomes quite relaxing, almost meditative.

 

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Woven: a curated set of stands at the far end of the fair focused on artists who work with fabrics, sewing, embroidery and other textile mediums was, I thought, one of the most thought provoking parts of the fair, and was pleased to see a less mainstream medium being celebrated. Included were Chitra Ganesh, Monika Correa and Cian Dayrit as well as many others. Working with themes and ideas such as Gender, Power, myth and reality, and historical narratives.

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Included in Woven was artist Angela Su who I completely adored and who’s work investigates perception and imagery of the body through metamorphosis and transformation. The works on display were almost like scientific drawings, delicate and beautiful, yet so real they were a little uncomfortable to look at. Looking closer at these drawings you realise they are incredibly intricate embroidery and honestly, I could have starred at them all day.

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Last year I mentioned that I was concerned that the representation of women at the fair was more of a fashion statement and less about real change. Although I stand by my concern, I was pleased to see that a lot of galleries embraced diversity this year, this was mainly the smaller galleries and stands but it was there, nonetheless. I noticed a lot of attention being given to artists from African nations which was fantastic to see, and I appreciated the introduction to some new an exciting artists.

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I also attended The Other Art Fair for the private view and at the risk of upsetting some people, I don’t have much to say about it. I always enjoy going, catching up with artists and friends but recently I feel like it is getting repetitive. I’m not saying it’s a bad fair, I would just like to see something new.

Finally, I visited the new Hyundai Commission at Tate modern which this year features ‘Fons Americanus’, a 13 meter tall fountain by artist Kara Walker. Inspired by the Victoria memorial outside Buckingham palace but exploring ideas and themes resulting from the transatlantic slave trade. I have long been a fan of Kara Walker and to see her work in the setting of the turbine hall was something quite special. Its open until April so I recommend a visit!

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Sweet ‘Art’s Frieze Week In Pictures

Tracey Emin's The Last Great Adventure Is You opening night at White Cube.

Tracey Emin’s The Last Great Adventure Is You opening night at White Cube.

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Tracey Emin’s The Last Great Adventure Is You opening night at White Cube.

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Tracey Emin’s The Last Great Adventure Is You opening night at White Cube.

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Tracey Emin’s The Last Great Adventure Is You opening night at White Cube.

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Saatchi’s New Sensations private view, Lauren Cohen’s ‘Purple Socks’

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Saatchi’s New Sensations private view, Mollie Douthit’s ‘Show Me That Trick Again’

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Saatchi’s New Sensations private view.

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The Future Can Wait private view, Wendy Mayer’s ‘Ophelia’

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Corrina at Saatchi’s New Sensations private view.

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Poly Morgan at The Other Art Fair opening night.

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The Other Art Fair opening night.

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Moniker Art Fair opening night.

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Open Walls Gallery stand at The Moniker Art Fair opening night.

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Dannielle Hodson in her shop at The Sanderson Hotel

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Dannielle Hodson’s doodles at The Sanderson Hotel

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Joyce Pensato’s ‘Mickey for Mickey’ at Frieze Art Fair

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Frieze Art Fair

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Diana on a mission!

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‘The Collector’ at Frieze Masters

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More of Frieze Art Fair

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Bex Massey ‘he’s So Hot Right Now’ at the Young Masters prize.

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Private view at the Angus Hughes Gallery

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Sadie Lee works at the Angus Hughes Gallery

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Gillian Wearing at the Maureen Paley Gallery

Contributions by Anthony Didlick, Diana Ilies, Charlotte Elliston, Corrina Eastwood, B Drobnak