Lockdown Art, Part 1 – by Charlotte Elliston

It’s been three weeks since serious preventive measures against Covid-19 hit the UK; businesses closed, and many of us became restricted to our homes. We Sweet ‘Arts are lucky in that we all have access to laptops and wifi, so can access the cultural resources that many museums and galleries are making available online. (I did a quick list at the beginning of the lockdown, but I think this has expanded greatly since then). However, we still feel that there is no substitute for experiencing a work of art in real life, rather than from a screen. So we are taking our art viewing a little closer to home, and really enjoying looking at some of the work we already have in our homes and will bring you a short series of blogs about some of the stuff we look at on a daily basis – getting stuck in to really seeing it and thinking about it, rather than just glancing at it on the way out of the door.

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From the film Ferris Bueller’s day off – they are not paying attention to the art!

Like many people who work with visual art, my home is full of the stuff. Pretty much every spare wall has some kind of image on it, and alongside this, there is the art I own, but don’t have space to hang (I live in a 2 room flat) but am saving until I have that ever elusive prize in London, a house of my own. I tend to only buy art  which I have a personal connection with; most of my artwork has been created by people I know, and a few of the pieces are much-loved gifts over the years. Here is just a small selection of what I’ve enjoyed looking at lately (please bear in mind that images are taken in my home, behind glass and not always in good light – follow the links to the artist pages for their professional shots).

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Untitled by Kevin Percival

Untitled? (2018) – Kevin Percival

If this piece did have a title, I’m afraid I have forgotten it – sorry Kev! This artwork comes from photographer Kevin Percival’s Tanera (Ar Duthaich) project. For 14 months, he lived and worked on the Scottish island Tanera Mor, once a port for herring fishing, but then a tiny community where a handful of people resided. The series as a whole is a beautiful and moving exploration of the end of a community and way of life (the island has now been purchased for development into a holiday retreat and there are no current residents on the island). I love the photograph I own due to its humour (the unexpected pair of legs emerging from behind the washing line), and unusual and contemporary take on the idea of the portrait. These elements, along with the clever composition and tangible texture of the grass, keep me looking at this piece again and again. The book with photos from the project is for sale on Kevin’s website and there are further images of his work on this and other projects online too.

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Some more images from the project in Kevin’s book

Fortune Cookie (2019) – Jenny Chan

I am a fiddler. At my desk at work, I’ve acquired a large amount of stuff that was going into the bin that I can fiddle with; 3d printed figures, a wooden farmer with one leg, bits of cotton tape and the like. On my home work desk, I’ve been able to pick some of my beautiful tactile items to enjoy. One of these is Jenny Chan’s fortune cookie, given to me by my friend Amelia who knows lots about contemporary ceramic artists. The artist was born in Hong Kong but now lives in the UK and much of her work explores her identity and Chinese heritage.

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My fortune cookie – excuse the old lady looking hands which are even worse then normal right now.

Nina (2019) – John Lee Bird

Nina Simone also sits on my home desk. The work is a lino cut in a vibrant red ink and seems to be taken from a publicity image of the singer. The piece comes from a series of 72 lino cuts created by John called Idle Love, where he explored his creative influences which continue to inspire him today.

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Nina by John Lee Bird

I love Nina Simone’s music and admire the way that she used her platform to speak (sing) about civil rights, women’s rights and racism. John often works with line and colour to create portraits of contemporary performers, and this recent series is an extension of his work as a painter – I visited his studio in 2014 and you can read the blog about this visit here. In this image, Nina oozes the power and pride she had in her black-womanhood and this is why I love it.

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Original 1955 publicity shot of Nina Simone

Boy (2013) – Joanna Layla

This piece was exhibited as part of Sweet Art’s Summer Show in 2013, which was my first exhibition on-board as co-curator. I loved Joanna’s sensitive minimal line, which captured the expression and absorption of the boy in this image, which was part of her collection of drawings created while travelling in South East Asia. As someone with a complete inability to draw from life myself, I also admire her skill in creating these images from sketches done on the move.

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Boy by Joanna Layla

Joanna has gone on to become a successful and very in-demand illustrator, teaching at London College of Fashion and Central St Martins as well as continuing her own practice. This piece on her website of Mary Katranzou’s designs is one of my favourites from her recent work.

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Mary Katranzou by Joanna Layla

This is just a tiny snippet of some of the art I have at home and, along with Corrina and Siân, we hope to introduce you to some more artists and their work over the coming weeks.

 

Fashion inspired by art/art inspired by fashion – Seams by Anthony Didlick

So Seams is over! A huge thank you to all the artists, visitors and everyone who made it happen! Over 400 people turned up to the private view on Saturday 13th to enjoy the fantastic work and the delicious cocktails such as the Sipsmith Moscow Mule and Crystal Cranberry courtesy of our awesome sponsors Sipsmith and Crystal Head Vodka.

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We were also provided with beautiful goodie bags contributions by Preciosa! Coinciding with London Fashion Week Seams aimed to connect, contrast, challenge and contextualize the worlds of fashion and art. With 67 artists and designers exhibiting, the show featured works from a variety of media.
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It was definitely another one of our fantastic Sweet ‘Art parties but as always we hope to give back and support a good cause: this time Body, a charity that strives to support people with body related issues including Body Dismorphic Disorder.
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During the night, amongst the crowds, you could see models wearing some of the beautiful garments chosen for Seams. Guests were treated to the incredible metal skeletal gowns by artist Angela Morris Winmill and the fabulous sound responsive light up jackets by Shara Hayz that were worn by our glamorous Sweet ‘Art interns!
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You could also check out the work of Rococo Wonderland, two jet black mannequins, one embellished with peacock feathers, contrasted with neon signs depicting the words ‘fragile’ and ‘lust’. There were also the challenging and critiquing works of John Gathercole whose fleshy and distorted paintings of women question the concept of beauty in our society and fashion norms. Artist Iluá Hauck da Silva’s stunning piece Veins of Vanity II explored the connection between beauty, pain and pleasure commenting on current social values and the construction of history and traditions.
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If you were able to make it or not, check out the rest of the pictures on our website and if you would like to exhibit in our next show ‘Guilty Pleasures’ do check out our opportunities page.
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